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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  September 25, 2017 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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today at 5. a future labour government would look to scrap the controversial pfi contracts on schools and hospital projects in england. at the labour conference in brighton john mcdonnell said the contracts could cost the taxpayer £200bn over coming decades. i can tell you today, it's what you've been calling for. we'll bring existing pfi contracts back in house. we're bringing them back in house. we're bringing them back. also at the conference, labour says the uk could stay in a single market after brexit. we'll have the latest from brighton and we'll be talking to the shadow brexit minister. the other main stories on bbc news at 5... a 16 year—old girl is arrested on suspicion of attempted murder after the stabbing of a woman at a school in north lincolnshire. in germany, right—wing nationalists celebrate third place in the elections and promise to tackle what they call a ‘foreign invasion‘. the boss of uber has apologised for
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making mistakes and it will make changes to win back its licence. and all eyes on the turner prize. we look at the four nominees in the running for one of the art world's most prestigious awards. it's 5 o'clock. our main story is that a future labour government would consider cancelling pfi contracts, the controversial schemes which enable some public building projects to be funded with private money. the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell made the commitment at the labour conference in brighton. he said pfi contracts were likely to cost the public sector more than 200 billion pounds over the next few decades and it was time to reduce the cost to the tax payer. after he spoke the party said it
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would ‘review‘ the contracts. during the day labour also suggested the uk could remain in a single market and some form of customs union following brexit. our political correspondent eleanor garnier reports from brighton. all smiles as they try to put on a united front, but there's no hiding it. it's plain for all to see. divisions in labour over brexit once again coming to the fore. what i want to do is first off all congratulate conference. yesterday you voted away your chance to remain in the single market. you voted away your chance to stay in the eu. you have as much chance of stopping brexit as jeremy corbyn has of wearing my tottenham shirt! get real! he's certainly widely adored here.
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jeremy corbyn‘s position and policies now almost unchallenged in labour. but for the crucial issue of brexit, while labour deals with internal divisions, its shadow brexit secretary insisted the party was a government in waiting. no rash ideological red lines preventing a sensible deal. no fantastical blue sky proposals. a pragmatic approach. labour are now the grown—ups in the room. we stand ready to take charge of these negotiations, not acting for narrow political gain but in the national interest. brexit rows and all, conference is now in full flow, but as labour tries to divert attention away from its difficulties on the eu, it hopes new policies like a cap on credit card interest will be popular with voters. i am calling upon the government to act now and apply the same rules
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on payday loans to credit card debt. it means that nobody will ever pay more in interest than their original loan. if the tories refuse to act, i can announce today that the next labour government will amend the law. and there was also an expensive announcement about pfi, the programme of funding public infrastructure projects with private capital. we'll put an end to this scandal and we will reduce the cost to taxpayers. how? well, we have already pledged that there will be no new pfi deals signed by us in government. but we'll go further and i can tell you today it's what you have been calling for. we will bring existing pfi contracts back in—house. labour is trying to show it has got the ideas to propel it into government. it hopes to prove notjust to its own supporters but voters elsewhere it's got what it takes to lead the country. eleanor garnier, bbc news, brighton. joining me now from the labour
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conference in brighton is labour's shadow brexit minister jenny chapman. thank you forjoining us. under what circumstances do you think britain could stay in a single market? we have said all along that we think that the government ought to be leaving the single market and the customs union on the table. and we think they are being idea logically driven and unreasonable in saying that one of their red line almost is that one of their red line almost is that we should not be in a customs union or a single market. what the labour party is interested in are the outcomes and we are interested in getting the benefits of single market membership and we are not hung up precisely on how that is achieved. the good game that from membership of the single market or
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you could gain that through a trade deal we are not hung up about how it is done, it is the outcomes that matter. the question you will be as straightaway by lots of people, if thatis straightaway by lots of people, if that is the case and the european union comes back and says let's talk about that, as long as you're happy with the principle of freedom of movement, what will be the labour response? the labour party has been clear on freedom of movement because they know what an important issue it is and we understand that freedom of movement will end when we leave the european union. we want to keep it through the transitional phase because the government is not going to be ready on time to have a new immigration policy by march, 2019 but we know that this country, for the first time in a very long time will need a new immigration policy and freedom of movement will end at the end of transition. it squaring that ambition with the other ambition to be within a single
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market that is similar at least to the one that we have access to now and lots of people find it difficult to imagine that you will be able to deliver that kind of deal. that is right and deliver that kind of deal. that is rightandi deliver that kind of deal. that is right and i understand that and that is the way that these negotiations are conducted matters so much and the way that the government has approached this, which has been to set a very bad tone and to be quite high—handed with eu partners so far has not been the right approach and to waste the time that the government has we think has been the wrong approach. we are 15 months in, very little progress has been made and we feel that the labour party would have done a betterjob of it, frankly, we would have a much better chance of obtaining what is as you say a challenging outcome, but what is the point of embarking on these negotiations if you're not ambitious for the outcome? a point about what has been said in the last half an
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hour, there were two brief state m e nts hour, there were two brief statements by michel barnier and david davis before this latest round of talks, michel barnier saying u nless of talks, michel barnier saying unless these big issues of northern ireland citizens and money are sorted out we cannot move on to talk about what comes after that and david davis seem to be saying the opposite, what is the resolution if there is no real meeting of minds at this point? i think you need reasonableness on both sides are particularly when it comes to northern ireland. i can completely understand why the government feels it needs more time to address those issues. these are notjust issues of trade or borders when it comes to northern ireland and there will not bea simple northern ireland and there will not be a simple solution. we certainly need to think about our future relationship before we can properly resolve the issues there. i think i have some sympathy for what david davis said and i think you need
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reasonableness on the part of michel barnier as well because both sides are going to have to resolve this together, but had it been keir starmer in brussels negotiating rather than david davis, i think the mood would have been very different today. jerry chapman, good to talk today. jerry chapman, good to talk to you in writing. 0ur chief political correspondent vicki young is also in brighton. i will come to the pfi question in a second. can i ask you for your reading of this latest labour thinking on brexit? what is interesting is that they have had no substantive interesting is that they have had no su bsta ntive vote interesting is that they have had no substantive vote here on all of that, on the actual policy if you like, but we have had keir starmer laying out the labour position on all of this and i think mainly what he is doing is keeping his options open. the mood here is a bit like a party, they are buoyant, saying they
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are ready for a general election which they think they have a chance of winning, in which case they would be taking over these negotiations. keir starmer about a transitional period, saying he would want that, where we would stay pretty much the single market and the customs union but also that we would have to accept the rules during that time. the big unknown is what happens after that and i think maybe deliberately keeping the options open on that, there are some within the party being very vociferous about saying we have to lay out now that we would keep that option of staying within the single market. he is not ruling it out, but i think he is not ruling it out, but i think he is aware of course that there are many labour supporters who voted for brexit who would not consider the u:k.'s stain in the single market as
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it been brexit in any sense of the word. he accused the tories today of constructive ambiguity over brexit andi constructive ambiguity over brexit and i think it is fair to say that labour might be doing a little bit of that themselves as well. thank you very much. we will talk more about the events in brighton in a short while. so three days after the prime minister's speech in florence when she tried to restore momentum to the brexit talks the brexit secretary, david davis, is leading the british team of negotiators into their fourth round of talks with eu officials in brussels. it's the first opportunity for the european delegation to respond to mrs may's remarks. michel barnier said there had been insufficient progress. the european union is keen and eager to understand better how the uk government will translate the prime minister's speech into negotiating positions. it is essential and would enable us to advance this week, i hope and make real progress over the coming months. on citizens rights we
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will incorporate the agreement fully into uk law and take steps to ensure consistent interpretation. we hope to make progress on issues like the onward movement of uk citizens and the european union 's and voting rights in local elections. we both wa nt rights in local elections. we both want to avoid changes to the way that citizens enjoy their rights and out that citizens enjoy their rights and our proposals will deliver that. on northern ireland and ireland, we made good progress in the last round with a common desire to maintain the common travel area and protect the good friday agreement. this week will be about crunching through the technical details of how we together make that happen. david davis and michel barnier. 0ur europe correspondent kevin connollyjoins us from brussels. listening to those statements, how much of a golf is there?|j listening to those statements, how much of a golf is there? i think there is a clear distinction that we can see there, michel barnier never lets assertion go by without that
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almost theological repetition of the basic position of the european union, there has to be progress on the first phase issues, the irish border, the financial settlement and citizens rights before there can be any possibility of moving on to future trade talks. 0n the uk side, there has always been a feeling that that rigidity is the british would see it is about holding the european union 27 together and is not necessarily practical. how can you discuss future arrangements on the irish border if you do not discuss at least to some extent future trade relationships in parallel or at the same time? i think david davis at one point in that very brief appearance before reporters here in brussels talked about the need for leadership and flexibility and i think that is going to be seen as a coded call for the european side to bea coded call for the european side to be a bit less wedded to its phased and very carefully structured negotiation timetable. we heard on
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that similar theme, talk of an innovative and creative approach. what is the view in brussels on that call and are they prepared in any way to answer that call with maybe a slightly looser approach to some of these conditions? well, the truth is that there has so far been no sign of it. they would interpret any talk of it. they would interpret any talk of creativity or leadership for flexibility as the british side trying to open up debates for that aspect of the future relationship before tying down the issue, i think above all else, frankly, of money and that is really what is at the heart of this. david davis again implied pretty clearly i thought when he was talking to reporters that the british side sees the amount of money that would eventually be paid into the european union coffers, also of course, as pa rt union coffers, also of course, as part of a quid pro quo about what sort of trade deal you would ultimately end up with. there is a
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clear distinction i think emerging their about the usefulness of how their about the usefulness of how the eu is trying to structured these talks but i think the british side has never been entirely comfortable with. also, how you make a breakthrough if the eu does indeed stick to that timetable and that schedule for the talks and the british side keep wanting to push them into other areas. thank you for joining us again. those talks just underway now in brussels, if there is any outcome or a signal of honour we will be back with that as soon as they get it. later in the programme. . . and later in the programme we'll be getting the thoughts of mario monti, the former prime minister of italy — and before that a european commissioner. his perspective on what is going on would be very interesting. that will happen ina would be very interesting. that will happen in a short while. a 16—year—old girl has been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder after stabbing a 61 year—old woman at a school in north lincolnshire. the school welfare officer at winterton community academy
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was seriously wounded. caroline bilton is at the school. tell us what we know so far about the circumstances so far. just after nine o'clock this morning panicked pa rents were nine o'clock this morning panicked parents were coming into the winterton community academy gates here behind me. they had received a text m essa g e here behind me. they had received a text message from the school telling them of a serious incident that had taken place here. what had happened? well a pupil had stabbed a member of staff. the victim, 61—year—old welfare support worker. it happened in her office, it was an isolated incident and it is believed that a small kitchen knife had been used that had been brought on the premises today. the victim taken to hospital with
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serious but non—life—threatening injuries and she is said to be in a co mforta ble injuries and she is said to be in a comfortable position in hospital this evening. a 16—year—old girl has been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder and she is being questioned by police. earlier i spoke to parents here, shocked that what had happened, this school is in a quiet cul—de—sac in lincolnshire, this is out of the ordinary what has happened. they told me how children had been told to stay in their classrooms, the school effectively placed on lock down here this morning while calm was restored. the head teacher has spoken tonight of how proud he is of the staff, the quick thinking staff who brought the situation under control quickly. he said at no point were other children at risk. indeed, this school did remain open today, it did not close, but many parents took the opportunity to take their children home, going home in shock this morning at what happened here at winterton community academy. caroline, thank you very much for the update. this is bbc news at five — the headlines: a future labour government would consider cancelling pfi
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contracts the controversial schemes which enable some public building projects to be funded with private money. the eu chief negotiator says real progress on the divorce bill is essential before a brexit transition period can be discussed. a 16 year old girl is arrested on suspicion of attempted murder — over the stabbing of a woman at a school in north lincolnshire. and in sport at the fa board say they are confident that following they are confident that following the controversial sacking of mark sampson as the women's england manager that the right procedures are in place to prevent a similar issue arising in the future. gareth barry is preparing to break the premier league appearance records if the midfielder plays for west brom against arsenal tonight that will be 633 games. and johanna konta's terrible run of form continues as
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she is knocked out in her opening match in china. more on those stories just after half past five. in germany, the right—wing nationalist party afd has emerged as the third biggest party in the german parliament after the weekend elections and it's promised to tackle what it calls ‘an invasion of foreigners' into germany. chancellor angela merkel whose cdu party won most seats is starting her fourth term in office and is forming a new coalition government. she says she will not be driven by the afd‘s populist agenda. 0ur correspondent gavin lee's report from berlin contains some flashing images. there's a new party in town. and they're talking of a revolution in german politics. the afd have emerged in the last four years, they're populist, anti—immigrant, anti—islam, and described as toxic by mainstream german parties. but with 12% of the vote, 5 million people supporting them, they're now the third biggest party
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in the bundestag, with a pledge to put german people first. translation: we will hunt them down. we'll hunt mrs merkel down, and we'll take back our country, and our people. but at this morning's press conference, cracks were already showing in the leadership, the group's chairwoman frauke petry announcing that she is leaving the party, telling reporters its rhetoric has become too extreme. this is one of the more deprived parts of berlin. in this eastern district, 20% of voters chose the alternative for germany. people here talk about being left behind, being forgotten, that they're not listen to. and the one issue that keeps coming up here and elsewhere in the country that has led to more people wanting change is how they perceive angela merkel dealt with the migration crisis. i didn't like angela merkel,
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because there was no stop in the refugee politics. it was all too quick, and she didn't say, like, 0k, we stopped at that and that number. translation: i think we should give the afd a chance to see if they are really for the state and everyone. translation: it's ok for people to come to germany when they really need help, but we've got poor people, too. angela merkel gives little away. but at last night's cdu celebration, she was clear that despite gaining most votes, the fact that 1 million of her supporters opted instead for the afd has disturbed her. translation: we will have to win back those who voted afd by solving their problems, listening to their concerns and fears, and with good politics. this is how votes translate to seats in parliament. six parties will share power in the bundestag with a record number of mps.
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but for the world's most powerful woman, in europe's richest country, the certainty and stability enjoyed for so long by the so—called miracle machine has been challenged. an oxford university student who stabbed her ex—boyfriend has been given a 10 month suspended sentence. medical student, lavinia woodward, pleaded guilty to the attack in may. our correspondent, jon donnison, is at oxford crown court. what is the latest? lavinia woodward will avoid going to prison for now but only if she does not reoffend for 18 months. the background to this case goes back to the 30th of december last year when following a row with her then boyfriend at christ church college in oxford, she
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stabbed him with a bread knife, stabbed him with a bread knife, stabbed him with a bread knife, stabbed him in the lower leg and also cut his hand as well. the court heard how she had been drinking heavily, it she also had a drug addiction problem. now, in sentencing today, the judge addiction problem. now, in sentencing today, thejudge ian pringle qc said that lavinia woodward had shown complete genuine remorse and that she had engaged since then in an extensive drug rehabilitation programme. the reason this case has generated some controversy is because in an earlier hearing thejudge had controversy is because in an earlier hearing the judge had suggested because she was, and extraordinarily able young lady, she might avoid a custodial sentence. that led to headlines in some of the tabloid newspapers asking if she was too clever to go to prison. today though, 0xford clever to go to prison. today though, oxford university have not said whether she will be expelled
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from her studies, but her dreams of becoming a heart surgeon which is what she always wanted to do, now look pretty remote. thank you very much for the update. some newsjust in from washington. the us defence department of the pentagon saying about the crisis in relations with north korea saying that if north korea does not stop provocative actions, the pentagon says it will make sure that president trump is provided with options to deal with pyongyang. rather terse statement from the pentagon saying that if north korea does not stop provocative actions, president trump will be presented with options, clearly they are suggesting military options from the department of defence, to deal with pyongyang. earlier today there was another escalation the rhetoric when the north korean foreign minister said that america had declared war on
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north korea and the world should remember that, said the foreign minister and that pyongyang was prepared to take countermeasures, that included the right to sit —— shoot down us strategic bombers even if they did not encroach on north korean airspace. that statement today, earlier today from pyongyang, now with this statement from the pentagon saying that president trump will be presented with options if this continues. some more of the news today. a surgeon has been stabbed in the neck on his way to a mosque in greater manchester —— in a suspected hate crime. dr nasser kurdy was attacked outside the altringham and hale muslim association yesterday evening. he was taken to hospital, and has since been discharged. police are questioning two men over the attack —— as our corrspondentjudith moritz reports. i don't know. he had something in his hand. moments after he was stabbed, this is nasser kurdy inside the mosque where he had gone for prayers.
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mr kurdy was on his way into the building when he became aware of another man across the road. moments later, he was attacked. so i had to run into the hall and i felt threatened. today, he is recovering at home, and is very thankful to be alive. i remember a heavy blow to the back of my neck. and that was after i've entered the premises. it was a total shock. i genuinely felt he was going to run after me into the mosque and just carry on what he started. it felt that way. the anger that was coming across was quite clear to me. greater manchester police are treating the attack as a hate crime but have not classified it as terrorist related. they've arrested two men aged 5a and 32 in connection with it. members of the mosque community say they have experienced some low—level abuse before, but it is unusual here. as a community, we will
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stand strong, we will. of course it's very important here that we stand together. not just as the muslim community, but as a wider community from altrincham and trafford because that is what we have done in the past. nasser kurdy has been watching the footage of himself after the attack. as an orthopaedic surgeon he was treated in hospital by the medical staff he normally works alongside, and he's very aware that his neck wound could have been a lot worse. there's a lot of vital structures in that area. and some of them can be fatal. there's no two ways about it. some of them can be very disabling. nasser says he won't be deterred from going to mosque, and has been comforted by the support he has received from people of all faiths. judith moritz, bbc news, altrincham. let us get the latest on this story
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about uber. the boss of the taxi service uber has apologised for the ‘mistakes' they've made —— after the company was refused a new licence to operate in london. transport for london said it had concerns over the company's conduct. uber is appealing against the decision —— but admitted it had ‘got things wrong'. let's get more from our correspondent simon gompertz. what have they admitted? just to fill you in on the letter, it is from the man who is the head of uber worldwide and he was brought in less than one month ago to spruce up the image of uber after problems it had in the united states. i think this letter which starts, dear londoners, shows the seriousness with which uber worldwide now sees the developing problems in london. it is an important centre for them, it is the biggest in europe, they do not
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wa nt to the biggest in europe, they do not want to lose it but it looks as though from saturday they will not have the license. the letter says, while uber has revolutionised the way people move around cities around the world, it is true that we got things wrong along the way and it goes on, on behalf of everyone at uber globally, i apologise for the m ista kes we uber globally, i apologise for the mistakes we have made. we will appeal this decision, but we will do so appeal this decision, but we will do so with the knowledge that we must also change. he goes on about approaching it with humility. it is approaching it with humility. it is a complete change in their tone since friday when they reacted to the news that they were basically been seen as not fit to run a minicab service in london, quite belligerently and they said london is rejecting innovation. now we have this, they suddenly think, we might lose it. it is extraordinaire, there is intense interest, it is used by a lot of people. when
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they talk about trying to resolve it and the possibility of negotiations, how do you rate the chances of those talks and what are the issues they need to get across? with this new tome, sadiq khan has reacted by saying tfl, now you can enter into talks with uber. it will happen, they will sit down together and talk and it will be a sort of twin process. uber will have to appeal against this in the courts, because as long as it is appealing, it will carry on working in london. there are very serious issues, because they expressed reservations about they expressed reservations about the approach from uber to reporting serious criminal offences and the vetting of drivers. although there are three quarters of a million people who say they support uber in london, these are serious consideration some we have yet to see whether there is scope for some sort of a conciliation between the two. thank you for the update. time for a look at the weather.
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here's nick miller. the west of england saw sunshine. 0vernight, cloud with clear spells. more cloud than clear spells, h i llfo rt more cloud than clear spells, hillfort with the cloud. grizzly in places. cliff any period of time, low—level fog is possible. temperatures not going down too far. misty and murky, grey and in places damp tomorrow morning, with drizzle. they're with it, it begins to brighten up in the afternoon, some sunny spells coming through, breezy inafew sunny spells coming through, breezy in a few spots, most dry, a chance of showers in north—east scotland. maybe a straight one in wales and the south—west. most places will ta ke the south—west. most places will take dry, temperatures around 16 to 21. on wednesday, foggy in the east,
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wind picking up. 0utbreaks 21. on wednesday, foggy in the east, wind picking up. outbreaks of rain moving into northern ireland and parts of wales, and south—west england. ahead of that, dry but the rain will spread and overnight into thursday. this is bbc news at five. the headlines: a future labour government, would consider cancelling pfi contracts, the controversial schemes which enable some public building projects, to be funded with private money. i can tell you today, it's what you've been calling for. we'll bring existing pfi contracts back in—house. we're bringing them back. we're bringing them back! the eu's chief negotiator mr barnier says the divorce bill is necessary before a transition period can be discussed. the pentagon says if
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north korea doesn't stop provocative actions, it will make sure that president trump is provided with options to deal with pyongyang. it comes as the foreign minister accuses president trumbull declaring war on his country. a 16—year—old girl is arrested on suspicion of attempted murder, after the stabbing of a woman at a school in north lincolnshire. the boss of uber apologises for making mistakes, and says it will make changes to win back its licence in london. time to catch up with the dave's sports news. the fa insist they're confident that following last week's sacking of england women's manager mark sampson. the right procedures are in place to prevent a similar issue arising now, or in the future. sampson was dismissed following evidence of "inappropriate" behaviour in a previous role. here's our sports news correspondent richard conway. the fa say they will conduct a review into what they call
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historic processes, but a reminder that history to the fa in this instance means 2013, 2014 and 2015, that's how recent the events around mark sampson are known to have taken place. that investigation, that safeguarding inquiry took place back then, but martin glenn the fa's chief executive says he didn't become aware of the existence of the safeguarding case until october of 2015, and he didn't look into the exact details of it untiljust a couple of weeks ago. the fa board expressing their confidence in martin glenn and chairman greg clarke. they say they are of the belief that a similar situation will not occur again now or in the future. it would appear, as far as the fa board are concerned, case closed, nothing more to see, but not yet.
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damien collins the chair of the culture, media and sport committee, he wants to see fa officials before him and his panel of mps next month. they will come in for sustained scrutiny about who knew what and when. this matter is not overjust yet. gareth barry will break the premier league appearance record tonight. more than 19 years since his debut as a teenager for aston villa. match number 633 is for a different team, west brom at arsenal tonight, if selected of course. so at the age of 36 he'll surpass the previous mark set by ryan giggs. i'm really proud to have reached that number, you know. i've just said before they go so quickly. 20 years ago, i remember my debut really well. since then, so much has happened. i ended up getting to this number which is myself, and my family were proud to reach that great achievement. so, not something now because you're still out there doing yourjob, but when you're hanging
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up your boots, you'll look back and realise to reach that number was fantastic. johanna konta's recent run of bad form has continued in china, where she's gone out of the wuhan open at the first attempt. the british number one lost to australian ashleigh barty in the second round in china. konta lost the first set to love, before recovering to take the second and then served for the match in the decider, before losing out in the tie—break. england's billy vunipola says he'd accept taking a pay cut to play fewer matches with the number eight facing another four months out injured. his comments came before his latest injury to his knee. but after missing the lions tour with a shoulder problem, he'll now have to sit out the autumn internationals. and his england teammate ben youngs sez despite nathan hughes already proving he's an able deputy. he's sad not to have vunipola in the team. take billy out of any team and you
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are going to suffer. he is a big loss, but nathan came in last time when billy had a similar injury and he was absolutely outstanding, a terrific autumn, a great six nations as well. he's a guy that can slot in absolutely fine. the back row is a hugely competitive area anyway across england. that's all sport for now. you can keep up to date with all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport and i'll have more in sportsday at half past 6. so the fourth round of brexit negotiations, between the uk and the eu, are getting under way in brussels, and it the first opportunity for michel barnier and the eu team to respond to theresa may's speech in florence last week. did the prime minister offer enough to break the deadlock? my special guest today worked at the heart of the european union for a decade, as a senior commissioner, before being elected prime minister of italy. he is mario monti. thank you so much for coming in.
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pleasure. we will talk about brexit and the situation in germany because they are all tied up. on brexit today, when we heard mr davies and mr barnier going into day, there didn't seem to be a lot of room for compromise. barniersaying didn't seem to be a lot of room for compromise. barnier saying key issues need to be settled before talking about the future. david davis says they are all tied up, what is your reading of it? i think it is a learning process, and identity building process on the pa rt and identity building process on the part of the uk in the negotiations. because the uk is tied to itself, to its traumatic decision. the eu, on the other hand, is tired, mr barnier is tight, because he has behind him 27 governments, and the european parliament. so it's natural that it
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ta kes parliament. so it's natural that it takes some time. prime minister made's speech in florence was helpful, and i think that it will have to be the case that, as mr barnier is saying, some things need to be settled before longer term search for a joint identity starts. it's difficult for viewers, i think, to understand where the compromise is going to happen if the uk is still saying, "we can't settle all these questions because they our intimately tied to the kind of relationship we want after brexit." so where is the leeway for compromise there, do you think was that not very much. stop it is important to understand
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what the two parties have in mind, particularly the uk, as to what it wa nts particularly the uk, as to what it wants from the single market. because we initially had the idea that 3 fourth of the single market would be taken on board, except for free movement of people. then there was the view that there should be a ha rd was the view that there should be a hard brexit. no thanks to the single market. then it is not clear now. from the european point of view, the single market is really at the heart. by the way, it's ironic, but if we have such a well functioning single market in the eu, that's largely a british conservative product, because it was very much by mr thatcher and lord caulfield as commissioner. it's really sad that the conservatives and the british people took the founder away from
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its beautiful product. it was very much a conservative initiative back in the 80s, absolutely. a very blunt question, is there any chance at all that there could be some kind of access to the single market negotiated without full freedom of movement? i think, no. negotiated without full freedom of movement? ithink, no. and i negotiated without full freedom of movement? i think, no. and i think, what will be on offer i think, the pa rt what will be on offer i think, the part of the eu is the norwegian model. which has been going on for many years. but which has norway, applying with all the rules of the single market. unfortunately for them, not having any say. whereas them, not having any say. whereas the uk used to have a very powerful say. and because the single market does have a huge value, and it
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implies costs for its running, the norwegians pay an amount for participation in the single market. iam participation in the single market. i am confident that given the well—known degree of pragmatism of the uk, these points will be absolved. it is also very important, i must say, nobody on the continent believes, but particularly nobody in the uk believes that the budgetary issueis the uk believes that the budgetary issue is about finding the uk for having chosen to leave. a punishment? a punishment. it is not divorce, it is not an infringement of any law, it is the liquidation of a joint company. of any law, it is the liquidation of ajoint company. settling of any law, it is the liquidation of a joint company. settling viability is. exactly. when we look at the
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outcome that some people are looking towards, they think about the balance of advantage and disadvantage, what is the disadvantage, what is the disadvantage to the eu with brexit? how much harm does brexit imply for the eu in your view? considerable damage. i believe smaller than for the uk, but considerable more damage. i see that in two aspect. 0ne, obviously, from an external projection, take security, international politics and all that. losing the uk is a big loss. but also, very importantly, and i saw that daily when i was commissioner, the uk has traditionally been the most powerful advocate of free market competition not being afraid of globalisation of openness that we
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had at the table of the eu. so losing that voice, i think, will require an additional effort on the pa rt require an additional effort on the part of the other 27. for them not to become too interval acted, and too fearful of globalisation. can i tend to one of the other very powerful voices, if not the most powerful voices, if not the most powerful voices, if not the most powerful voices, that ofjimmy, and angela merkel is still in charge after the elections at the weekend. —— that of germany. how important is it for the current direction of the eu that chancellor merkel is still in her position? crucially important, really fundamental. this is really fundamental. she will be conditioned by the new landscape there. but i think everybody in europe come even those who do not
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share her political affiliation feel that she is an anchor of stability. and when we look at the forces she is having to content with, and the new parliamentary picture in germany, where you have the third because party, the afd, the hard right, that is most affected in some other european countries as well, your thoughts on the growth of populism of this kind, and the reasons for it. how do you read it? the reasons are many. the consequences, well, it is interesting to observe one thing. in one aspect, the various nations and populists that we have in various countries combine their strength. and may well make the process of european integration more problematic. but in another very important respect, the german nationalists of afd, and the others,
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oppose each other in one important respect. why? because if we look at the origin of afd, that was initially a movement not so much against immigration, but against the euro. they believe that sharing the currency with others in europe, the tra cts currency with others in europe, the tracts from the unity of monetary orthodoxy, and it is important for post—war germany's future has been, so they are always afraid that the others might pollute, by the way, forgetting that, with all due respect, it was germany and france, which first violated the stability mark, not the greeks or spaniards. so the euro is for afd a vehicle of
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pollution. the many southern european populists, the euro is the vehicle of excessive german dominance on the others. so this shows, to me, that whereas the various nationalists and populists can try to capture the imagination by forming a coalition for the people against bureaucracy, all the elites. the day after they hypothetically would be able to destroy the european union, which i believe will never happen, they would confront each other, cause national instincts would no longer be contained in an entity, which is
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there to avoid excessive conflicts and war. just finally, mario monti, we are in a time of uncertainty. brexit exercises minds in the uk and in brussels, but there are other uncertainties, too. as far as the future of the european union is concerned, you partly answered it in the last question, are you today less of an optimist than you were, say, ten years ago? ten years ago, for sure, say, ten years ago? ten years ago, forsure, ican say, ten years ago? ten years ago, for sure, i can tell you that i am now less of a pessimist and i was one year ago. write! i was really fearing that there would be a contagion out of brexit. the antibody effect has prevailed, but asa antibody effect has prevailed, but as a continental european, i amp 0swald —— i am puzzled, because we have always seen the under saxon component of the world, the uk, the us, as the most rational, pragmatic,
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able to base policy decisions on serious and analysis and forecasts. and we have all tried to imitate that, creating think tax, it —— think tanks. now we see brexit and the election of residentjohn, the anglo—saxon world seems in a superficial view to have turned their back on rationality and pragmatism, and continental europe, so the eu that will remain there, seems to have become an island of rationality for all its populist it tensions. i think we should avoid complacency. it is a great pleasure to pull —— talk to you. hang on a second. thank you. good to have him in the studio with
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us. this is bbc news at five. the headlines: a future labour government would consider cancelling pfi contracts, the controversial schemes which enable some public building projects to be funded with private money. the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier says real progress on the exit bill is essential before a transition period can be discussed. the pentagon says it will provide president trump with options to deal with north korea, if its provocations continue. the turner prize, one of the best—known prizes in the world for the visual arts, will be awarded in hull, the current uk city of culture, in december. each year, four artists are shortlisted, and the prize awarded for an outstanding exhibition or other presentation. previous winners including
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damien hirst and grayson perry. with me now is george vasey, curator of the turner prize exhibition in hull. thank you forjoining us. a word first of all, before we talk about the finalists, on the standard. what is your view on the standard this year? it's incredible. i have been talking to press all day, and there has been lovely feedback. people have been telling me it is the best turner prize they have seen in a long time. and the context brings a lot to the work. i am very excited to show everybody from tomorrow the standard of the work. if you can bear with me, i want you to take us through the four finalists. i want to start with the british artist hurvin anderson. talk us through the entry, and explain to us what commends these works to the judges, and why they might be worthy of the turner prize. hurvin anderson is primarily a painter, and works across landscape, portraiture and
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still live. he had micro—dosing the vic and exhibitions lasted. each artist is nominated for a show or project they have done the previous year anywhere in the world. hurvin ‘s paintings refer to the british landscape tradition, but also his jamaican heritage. his most famous body of work, paintings of barbershops, semifictional spaces that referred to his upbringing, but also to the afro—caribbean communities that establish these barbershops, in terms of an entre nehru —— entrepreneurial spirit. clearly rich in terms of cultural history, i wonder how you compare it if the comparison is fair with the german artist andrea buttner, who is also one of the finalists. andrea is also one of the finalists. andrea is a much more diverse artist in lots of ways, because she is primarily a printmaker. having said that, she makes copter, painting,
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collaborative projects. what she is showing for the turner prize is a range of work, there is one work thatis range of work, there is one work that is a big, fluorescent yellow ball, that is fabric taken from security guard uniforms. she is interested in value, how things are perhaps undervalued, and bringing a gravitas to them. thinking about labour that maintained and protect public spaces that is often, because of its ubiquity, is taken for granted. it is very striking. we are just looking here at an image on the screen. in real life, that expanse must be pretty vivid and striking. it is incredible. what we are trying to do with this year's turner prize is in bed it. you are seeing the old gallery spaces along the temporary spaces. are contemporary art isn't a speech, it has a direct reference to that collection and to the hall. can we move on to the third, i want to get through all four, the tanzania
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and artist, tell us a little. lubaina himid has been working since the 80s. 0ne lubaina himid has been working since the 80s. one major work we are showing is a fashionable marriage, which read mixes work from the 18th—century. it is updating it for the political climate. what you are seeing is margaret thatcher as the cou ntess, seeing is margaret thatcher as the countess, and she is making an interesting political work that deals with slavery and the contribution of black people within european culture. is that political edge one that really does appeal to a wide range of people who come, or would it put some people off? there's lots to see. there are lots of meaty ideas in there. this is a short list for serious times. we live in a very political climate at the moment. but there's lots to see. the gallery is also in the centre of the city and is free. we are asking
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for people to give us a little bit of time and curiosity. they will be surprised by what they see. can i ask you about the fourth darcis, rosalind nasher bishoo. —— basel ignashevich ab. she is basically a documentary film—maker, but her work often has scripted and staged elements. also within this film of animated sequences, within this film of animated sequences, she talks about the film being a way of countering the usual media fiction of gaza and its citizens. so try duarte delaet the contradictions that she felt on her visit there. just a quick point, if i may, it is kind of you to take us through those and give us the points so concisely, i mentioned that it is hole, the city of culture, i was delighted to visit a few weeks ago. —— hull of the city of culture. tell usa —— hull of the city of culture. tell us a little bit about the hull context. it is part of a year-long
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celebration as the uk city of culture. i have lived in hull since april, since i took on this position to cu rate april, since i took on this position to curate the turner prize. the enthusiasm that i have been met with, we are working with 3500 volu nteers across with, we are working with 3500 volunteers across the city. the turner prize is just one part of a huge programme of activity, notjust in the museums, but in public spaces. and it's really galvanised local communities, and pulled a huge amount of people to hull, and hull is gaining in confidence as a city. fantastic to see, george. many congratulations. thanks for putting us through it. brilliant, thank you. good of him to talk us through the exciting works. time for a look at the weather. here's nick miller. sunspots have been so cloudy, others
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have been so sunny today. i will show you some pictures that have come in from cornwall with good sunshine. northern ireland, too, west wales, the west of scotland, further east in scotland it has been great. this strip of cloud has made all the difference today. more sun in scotland, but underneath the cloud, not just mist in scotland, but underneath the cloud, notjust mist the anne mccoy, drizzly in places as well. the weather front came in and stayed. it is dying a death over the next few hours. leaving cloud over large parts of the uk overnight. low cloud with hill four, the higher you go, the poorer the visibility. clear at lower levels, fog developing in places. they misty and murky night to come, temperatures not going down too far, where cloud is that enough, drizzle at times. that goes for tomorrow morning, too. and inviting started tuesday, but bear with it, the cloud will break through the cloud, brighter conditions for many of us during the day. on a dry
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tuesday to come for them —— the waske daugherty of us. you see a hint ofa waske daugherty of us. you see a hint of a chance of catching a shower. most places will have a day of variable cloud, but some sunny spells. a breezy day in northern ireland compare to today. on the coast in scotland, breezes coming in from the sea, warm spots as high as 21. final weather continues as we go through tuesday evening. and the many during wednesday, but not all, you may notice. an atlantic weather system will bring rain into northern ireland during wednesday, bringing some to west and wales and south—west england. to the east of that, sunny spells continue. a breezy day across the uk. warmest way you get to season sunshine. this weather system quickly moves east on wednesday night and into thursday.
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0n wednesday night and into thursday. on thursday, it will gradually clear way. another one is waiting in the wings on friday. the weather is turning more mobile, more changeable at the end of the week. and through the weekend as well. after the rain, it clears away in eastern parts on thursday. most parts fine and dry, the weather system will bring rain in as we go through friday from the west. more information is available on the website. tonight at six: labour's vision for the economy — a radical reshaping of funding public sector projects. private companies have built hospitals and schools — but the shadow chancellor argues that so—called pfi deals are a rip off. we will bring the existing pfi contracts back in—house. we are bringing them back. applause. we are bringing them back. but labour's plans could cost tens of billions — where will the money come from? also tonight. a new round of brexit talks under
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way — but the eu's chief negotiator says he's still waiting for firm proposals from britain. stabbed outside his mosque — the surgeon who treated victims of the manchester arena bombing. record sales for aldi in the uk and ireland — a million more customers, so why are profits down?

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